these foods that can replace it in times of shortage

For several months, it has been increasingly difficult to find jars of mustard on the shelves. As the barbecue season is officially open, a quick overview of foods that can be used instead of condiment.

Mustard, missing from barbecues this summer? In supermarkets, mustard has been rare for some time. Like many other foods such as sunflower oil, consumers will have to do without the widely used condiment.

This shortage is partly explained by global warming. Canada, the world’s leading exporter of mustard seeds, accounts for 70% of French imports. In the summer of 2021, episodes of drought destroyed a large part of the harvests with a drop of 28%. As a result, prices soared, reaching 1,700 euros per tonne, double the previous year.

In France and more particularly in Burgundy, local farmers and the entire sector are experiencing difficulties in supplying French manufacturers. For several years, they have had to deal with a drop in their productivity while the cultivation of mustard seed is particularly fragile. It is then difficult for producers to keep up with demand. A shortage that should last according to professionals who hope that next year’s harvest will not be affected by the vagaries of the weather.

In the meantime, what alternatives for lovers of spicy dishes and homemade vinaigrettes? Here is a non-exhaustive list.

Horseradish

This root, little used in France, is appreciated in northern Europe for its very pronounced taste. Both spicy and peppery, this mix of black radish and wasabi is surely the food that comes closest to mustard. Hungary is the main European exporter while horseradish is eaten in sauce in British and Scandinavian cuisines with oysters, smoked fish or roast beef.

Wasabi

This green condiment is known to sushi lovers. Its very powerful aromas can frighten more than one, but it is enough to dilute it with fresh cream or add vinegar and oil to make a spicy sauce that can be used in different dishes.

Worcestershire sauce

Originally from England, this sweet and sour sauce is prepared with a base of molasses, malt vinegar, anchovies, shallot, onion and garlic. Its spicy taste can enhance grilled meats, vinaigrettes or marinades.

Homemade mustard

For the bravest, it is possible to find mustard seeds in grocery stores and thus, make your own mustard by adding water, salt and cider vinegar. An economical and ecological alternative, very practical in times of shortage.

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